Mapping Vehicle Commuters in New York City

Because many good things come in threes, I thought I’d round out this series of posts (looking at subways and bus commuters) on commuting trends in New York City with a look at vehicle commuters with this map: As before, this uses data from the US Census Bureau 2009-2013 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. It’s […]

Mapping NYCT Bus Transit Sheds

Alon Levy left a comment on my post earlier today about NYCT Subway transit sheds asking about bus travel. The code I’d written to access the Census API was easy to customize and I just swapped out the subway trips for bus to get this map: As I mentioned in my previous post, relatively few people on […]

Mapping the NYC Subway Transit Sheds

I’ve been fascinated with the idea of a transit shed since I first encountered it studying the transit system in New York City. The idea is similar to a watershed, the area drained by a particular river. Public transit lines are like rivers of people, feeding them into the great reservoirs of jobs all around […]

CorridorScope – A Day in the Life of Water Street

    According to IBM, we generated 2.5 billion gigabytes of data every day in 2012.  One of my passions is making that data comprehensible, especially when it concerns cities and the urban environment. Which is why I was excited when I found out about the BigIdea sponsored by the Alliance for Downtown New York for […]

Hello World – Urban Data Edition

I was recently asked to help teach business analytics for the City of New York Management Academy and in putting together an appropriate practical exercise, I thought about what made for the best introduction to the world of urban data.  In programming, there’s almost always what’s called a “Hello, world” exercise that gets programmers to be started with some tangible […]