Teaching Analytics to NYC Employees: Why Teach Analytics?

This blog post is part of a series of posts I’m doing outlining the experiences I’ve had in a year of teaching analytics classes to NYC employees. For more information on the courses I teach, see the Github repository of course outlines and other important information as well as the other posts in this series. The […]

The Art of Writing Automatic Tweets

I’m a coder, by which I mean, I like solving problems with code. The more elegant the code, the better. Being also trained in the humanities, I have a aesthetic sensibility, particularly around language. Having wanted to write a Twitter bot for a while, I finally took the time to deploy one (you can see it […]

Mapping NYCT Bus Transit Sheds

Alon Levy left a comment on my post earlier today about NYCT Subway transit sheds asking about bus travel. The code I’d written to access the Census API was easy to customize and I just swapped out the subway trips for bus to get this map: As I mentioned in my previous post, relatively few people on […]

Mapping the NYC Subway Transit Sheds

I’ve been fascinated with the idea of a transit shed since I first encountered it studying the transit system in New York City. The idea is similar to a watershed, the area drained by a particular river. Public transit lines are like rivers of people, feeding them into the great reservoirs of jobs all around […]

CorridorScope – A Day in the Life of Water Street

    According to IBM, we generated 2.5 billion gigabytes of data every day in 2012.  One of my passions is making that data comprehensible, especially when it concerns cities and the urban environment. Which is why I was excited when I found out about the BigIdea sponsored by the Alliance for Downtown New York for […]

You going to enumerate that?

Following my last post on OrderedDict in Python, I came across another useful technique for working with data in Python, the enumerate function. In C++, using an index to reference data is second nature, but in Python with list comprehensions. For example: mylist = [‘foo’,’bar’,’boo’] for i in mylist: print i >>>foo bar boo This returns the […]